Monthly Archives: December 2009

Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Thursday

What is the most northern point of land in the world?

According to the American Geographical Society, the most northern point of land in the world is Cape Morris K. Jessup on the extreme northeast area of Greenland.

Commander Robert E. Peary, an arctic explorer, killed a musk-ox within a half-mile of this point, and is credited for naming it, also. The cape was named after a New York banker and philanthropist, Morris K. Jessup.   Jessup helped finance several of Peary’s expeditions.

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Bonus Trivia for Wednesday

 

In ancient Greece women didn’t start counting their age until their wedding day, rather than the actual day they were born. They believed the wedding date was the real start of a woman’s life.

Hey, I don’t make ’em up, I just type the stuff in…

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Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Wednesday

 

What makes an ocean wave “break?”

Waves “break” when the water supporting it is only 1.3 times as deep as the wave is high. When it reaches this point, the water at the crest is moving faster than below; this typically occurs in water close to shore – which is more shallow – but can also occur further offshore if the wave is tall/high enough.

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Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Tuesday

Hershey’s Kisses are called that because the machine that makes them looks like it’s kissing the conveyor belt.

The term “the whole 9 yards” came from WWII fighter pilots in the Pacific. When arming their airplanes on the ground, the .50 caliber machine gun ammo belts measured exactly 27 feet, before being loaded into the fuselage. If the pilots fired all their ammo at a target, it got “the whole 9 yards.”

The phrase “rule of thumb” is derived from an old English law which stated that you couldn’t beat your wife with anything wider than your thumb.

An ostrich’s eye is bigger that it’s brain.

The longest recorded flight of a chicken is thirteen seconds.

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Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Monday

The airplane Buddy Holly died in was the “American Pie.” (Thus, the name of the Don McLean song.)

Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history: Spades ~ King David; Hearts ~ Charlemagne; Diamonds ~ Julius Caesar; Clubs ~ Alexander the Great.

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

Clans of long ago that wanted to get rid of their unwanted people without killing them used to burn their houses down ~ hence the expression “to get fired.”

Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4th, John Hancock and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn’t added until 5 years later.

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Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Sunday

The Sentence, “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” uses every letter in the alphabet. (Developed by Western Union to test telex/TWX communications.

In every episode of Seinfeld there is a Superman somewhere.

The average life span of a major league baseball is 7 pitches.

A duck’s quack doesn’t echo, and no one knows why.

Did you know that there are coffee flavored PEZ?

The reason firehouses have circular stairways is from the days of yore when the engines were pulled by horses. The horses were stabled on the ground floor and figured out how to walk up straight staircases.

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Gagler’s Trivia of the Day – Saturday

 

Why does water boil at lower temperatures on a mountain or higher altitudes?

At sea level, air pressure is 14.7 pounds per square inch; water will boil at 100 degrees Celsius at that pressure.

Since air pressure decrease as you increase the atmosphere, and since mountain pressure is less than sea level pressure, it doesn’t take as much temperature to make water boil.

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