Monthly Archives: April 2010

Bonus Trivia

 

Why does placing ice on the back of one’s neck sometimes stop, or slow, a nosebleed?

The ice reduces the temperature in the area of the neck containing blood vessels carrying blood to the nose. As a result, these blood vessels contract and close up, stopping (or slowing) the flow of blood.

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Trivia of the Day – Friday

 

How does Polaroid photography work?

Chemicals which simulate a darkroom are stored in a tiny container along one side of each exposure. As the photograph is being pushed out of the camera, roller squeeze the container open so the chemicals within spread across the exposure. One chemical is opaque during development, then turns gradually transparent in reaction to the developing, so that the more the photo is developed, the more you can actually see it.

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Trivia of the Day – Thursday

Jimmy Carter was the first U.S. president to have been born in a hospital.

Kangaroos can hop as fast as 40 miles per hour.

Chewing gum while peeling onions will keep you from crying.

Bats always turn left when exiting a cave.

The praying mantis is the only insect that can turn its head.

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Trivia of the Day – Wednesday

 

Why does the phrase “to kick the bucket” mean to die?

There are a number of explanations for the origin of this expression, but the most realistic one has to do with the way some people committed suicide in the past. It was once fairly common for a person intent on killing themself to do so by standing on an upturned bucket, putting a noose around his/her neck, and then “kicking the bucket.”

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Bonus Trivia

 

According to Walt Disney, Mickey Mouse received 800,000 fan letters in 1933. At an average of 66,000 letters per month, this exceeded the highest number ever achieved by a human being: 720,000, or an average of 60,000 per month in 1936 addressed to seven-year old Shirley Temple in 1936.

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Trivia of the Day – Tuesday

Why is corned beef called corned beef, especially since it doesn’t contain corn?

It has nothing to do with the vegetable, corn. Corned beef means preserved in salt.

The salt pellets originally used to preserve this type of beef were called “salt corns,” and beef cured this way ended up being called corned beef.

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Trivia of the Day – Monday

Why is it a sign of contempt to say someone’s name is “mud?”

The man who assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth, broke his leg during his escape from Ford’s Theater. Booth stopped by a country doctor’s office, who knew nothing about the assassination; after treatment, Booth went on his way. After the doctor heard about the assassination, he notified the authorities and was put in jail for his efforts: he was accused of being a co-conspirator. The injustice was later recognized, and he was subsequently pardoned by President Andrew Johnson.

This doctor’s name? Samuel Mudd. Soon after the assassination it became an expression of contempt to say your name was “Mudd.” Over time, people have forgotten “mud” is actually “Mudd.”

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