Monthly Archives: June 2011

Trivia of the Day for Thursday

What is a CAT Scanner?

CAT stands for computerized axial tomography, a way of taking photographs of cross sections of diseased tissue 100 times more detailed than by the traditional X-ray method.

The inventor was Godfrey Hounsfield of Britain’s Electrical and Musical Industries, the company that first brought television into the home.  The first CAT scanner in clinical use entered medical history in 1972 when it was used to diagnose a brain tumor in a woman patient in Wimbledon, England.

Hounsfield shared the Nobel Prize for physiology and medicine with American inventor Allan Cormack, who had independently worked on the principles of CAT scanning.

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Trivia of the Day for Wednesday

If you unfolded and laid out the delicate membranes from inside a dog’s nose, the membranes would be larger than the dog itself.

Kangaroos can hop as fast as 40 miles per hour.

The mudskipper is a fish that can actually walk on land.

The historic Ford 1,100-acre facility near the Rouge River was once the world’s largest auto plant. Henry Ford built the plant in 1918 because he dreamed of building a car from start to finish in one location.

The first subway was built in London (1860-63) by the cut and cover method. Other notable subways: Paris (the Metro 1898), New York (1900)

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Bonus Trivia

 

The famous French prophet and astrologer Nostradamus (1503-1566) predicted the world would end when Easter fell on April 25.

This has happened in 1666, 1734, 1886, and 1943. It will occur again in 2038.

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Trivia of the Day for Tuesday

Mailing an entire building has been illegal in the U.S. since 1916 when a man mailed a 40,000-ton brick house across Utah to avoid high freight rates.

The zoo in Tokyo closes for two months of the year so animals can have a holiday from visitors.

Methane gas can often be seen bubbling up from the bottom of ponds. It is produced by the decomposition of dead plants and animals in the mud.

The world’s smallest mammal is the bumblebee bat of Thailand, weighing less than a penny.

A garter snake can give birth to 85 babies.

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Trivia of the Day for Monday

What birds can fly immediately after being hatched?

The mound builders, a family of birds inhabiting Australia and certain South Sea Islands, are unique in that the young are hatched fully feathered and are able to fly and live an independent life from the moment they emerge from the shell.

These birds are called megapodes because of their large feet. Most species lay their eggs in large mounds constructed of loose soil, leaves, grass, twigs, etc. The mounds are ten to twelve feet high and contain several truckloads of material.

After the eggs are deposited they are left to hatch out by the heat of the decaying vegetable matter. The brush turkeys are the most common of the mound builders. One species of megapodes lays its eggs in the sand on the seashore and leaves them to be hatched by the heat of the sun.

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Trivia of the Day for Sunday

Kitsap County, Washington, was originally called Slaughter County, and the first hotel there was called the Slaughter House.

Men are 1.6 times more likely to undergo by-pass surgery than women.

There are 10 million bricks in the Empire State building.

Bob Dole is 10 years older than the Empire State Building.

The University of Calgary offers a two-day course in igloo building.

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Bonus Trivia

 

A little more than a century ago, there was an account of a flock of passenger pigeons in a column 500 yards wide that took three hours to pass over the observer: about a billion birds in all.

Today, the passenger pigeon is extinct.

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