Monthly Archives: October 2011

Bonus Trivia

On what night is Halloween observed when Oct. 31 falls on a Sunday?

Halloween isn’t an established holiday by law. It is traditional that Halloween is Oct. 31 no matter what day of the week it falls on. Halloween dates from 837 when Pope Gregory IV instituted All Saints or All Hallows Day on Nov. 1 to take the place of an earlier festival known as the Peace of the Martyrs. The day was set aside to honor all saints, known and unknown. Halloween then is a shortened form of All Hallows Eve – the evening before All Hallows Day. Certainly, you have a choice of celebrating it on Oct. 30, Saturday, if you wish. Many of the area parties will be held then rather than on Sunday. It’s probably appropriate to say some people equate Halloween with the occult or Satanism and don’t approve of it at all.

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Trivia of the Day for Monday

Playing cards were issued to British pilots in WWII. If captured, they could be soaked in water and unfolded to reveal a map for escape.

Most lipstick contains fish scales.

Upper and lower case letters are named ‘upper’ and ‘lower,’ because in the time when all original print had to be set in individual letters, the upper case’ letters were stored in the case on top of the case that stored the smaller, ‘lower case’ letters.

There are no clocks in Las Vegas gambling casinos.

There are no words in the dictionary that rhyme with orange, purple, and silver.

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Bonus Trivia for a Sunday

Why do (US coins) dimes, quarters and half-dollars have notched edges, while pennies and nickels do not?

The US Mint began putting notches on the edges of coins containing gold and silver to discourage holders from shaving off small quantities of the precious metals. Dimes, quarters and half-dollars are notched because they used to contain silver (through 1964). Pennies and nickels aren’t notched because the metals they contain are not valuable enough to shave.

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Trivia of the Day for Sunday

On average, 12 newborns will be given to the wrong parents daily.

John Wilkes Booth’s brother once saved the life of Abraham Lincoln’s son.

Warren Beatty and Shirley MacLaine are brother and sister.

Chocolate kills dogs! True, chocolate affects a dog’s heart and nervous system, and a few ounces are enough to kill a small-sized dog.

Daniel Boone detested coonskin caps.

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Bonus Trivia

Why does the phrase “to kick the bucket” mean to die?

There are a number of explanations for the origin of this expression, but the most realistic one has to do with the way some people committed suicide in the past. It was once fairly common for a person intent on
killing themself to do so by standing on an upturned bucket, putting a noose around his/her neck, and then “kicking the bucket.”

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Trivia of the Day for Saturday

Approximately 4.16% of your body weight is skin.

Once you are thirsty you are already dehydrated. Thirst is secondary.

The flying gurnard, a fish, swims in water, walks on land, and flies through the air.

The first cook book was written by the Greeks in 400 B.C.

There are 4,300 known species of ladybugs in the world.

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Trivia of the Day for Friday

Tornadoes, violently rotating columns of air extending from a thunderstorm to the ground, are among nature’s most virulent storms. In an average year, 800 tornadoes are reported across the United States,
resulting in 80 deaths and more than 1,500 injuries. The worst tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of 250 miles per hour or more.

Tornadoes can occur anywhere in the U.S. at any time of the year. In the southern states, the peak tornado season is March through May, while peak months in the northern states are during the summer.

Myth: Areas near rivers, lakes, and mountains are safe from tornadoes.

Fact: No place is safe. In the late 1980s, a tornado swept through Yellowstone National Park leaving a path of destruction up and down a 10,000-foot mountain.

Myth: The low pressure in a tornado causes buildings to “explode” as the tornado passes overhead.

Fact: Violent winds exceeding 200 miles per hour and debris slamming into buildings cause most structural damage.

Myth: Windows should be opened before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage.

Fact: Opening windows allows damaging winds to enter the structure and wastes precious time. Leave the windows alone; instead, immediately go to a safe place.

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