Monthly Archives: September 2013

Trivia of the Day for Monday

Eskimo ice cream is neither icy, or creamy.

A jellyfish is 95 percent water.

In Bangladesh, kids as young as 15 can be jailed for cheating on their finals.

The katydid bug hears through holes in its hind legs.

A company in Taiwan makes dinnerware out of wheat, so you can eat your plate.

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Trivia of the Day for Sunday

Maine is the only state whose name is just one syllable.

There are only four words in the English language which end in “-dous” tremendous, horrendous, stupendous, and hazardous.

Los Angeles’s full name is “El Pueblo DE Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula”-and can be abbreviated to 3.63% of its size “L.A.”

A cat has 32 muscles in each ear.

An ostrich’s eye is bigger than its brain.

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Trivia of the Day for Saturday

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

“Dreamt” is the only English word that ends in the letters “mt.”

The State of Oregon offers an annual $50 tax credit for the permanent and complete loss of the use of two limbs. I think I would rather have my limbs.

Almonds are a member of the peach family.

Winston Churchill was born in a ladies’ room during a dance.

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Trivia of the Day for Friday

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver, and purple.

Clans of long ago that wanted to get rid of their unwanted people without killing them used to burn their houses down – hence the expression “to get fired.”

Canada is an Indian word meaning “Big Village.”

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Bonus Trivia

Why do people say the “coast is clear” when they really mean no one is looking?

The expression started with ocean-going smugglers around the 1600’s, and it originally meant no one was guarding the coast and it was safe to sail on about their journey.

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Trivia of the Day for Thursday

Ivory bar soap floating was a mistake. They had been over mixing the soap formula causing excess air bubbles that made it float. Customers wrote and told how much they loved that it floated, and it has floated ever since. (It floats in gasoline, too.)

Studies show that if a cat falls off the seventh floor of a building it has about thirty percent less chance of surviving than a cat that falls off the twentieth floor. It supposedly takes about eight floors for the cat to realize what is occurring, relax and correct itself.

The saying “it’s so cold out there it could freeze the balls off a brass monkey” came from when they had old cannons like ones used in the Civil War. The cannonballs were stacked in a pyramid formation, called a brass monkey. When it got extremely cold outside, they would crack and break off… Thus the saying.

Your stomach has to produce a new layer of mucus every two weeks or it will digest itself.

The Sanskrit word for “war” means “desire for more cows.”

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Trivia of the Day for Wednesday

A group of unicorns is called a blessing. Twelve or more cows are known as a “flink.” A group of frogs is called an army. A group of rhinos is called a crash. A group of kangaroos is called a mob. A group of whales is called a pod. A group of ravens is called a murder. A group of officers is called a mess. A group of larks is called an exaltation. A group of owls is called a parliament.

The phrase “sleep tight” derives from the fact that early mattresses were filled with straw and held up with rope stretched across the bed frame. A tight sleep was a comfortable sleep.

“Three dog night” (attributed to Australian Aborigines) came about because on especially cold nights these nomadic people needed three dogs (dingos, actually) to keep from freezing.

Gilligan of Gilligan’s Island had a first name that was only used once, on the never-aired pilot show. His first name was Willy. The skipper’s real name on Gilligan’s Island is Jonas Grumby. It was mentioned once in the first episode on their radio’s newscast about the wreck.

In England, the Speaker of the House is not allowed to speak.

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