Monthly Archives: January 2015

Bonus Trivia

Why is some china called “bone” china?

Some china is called “bone” china because some powdered animal bone is mixed in with the clay used to make this china: it gives the china a special kind of strength, whiteness, and translucency.

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Trivia of the Day for Saturday

A garter snake can give birth to 85 babies.

If you unfolded and laid out the delicate membranes from inside a dogs nose, the membranes would be larger than the dog itself.

Kangaroos can hop as fast as 40 miles per hour.
The mudskipper is a fish that can actually walk on land.

The historic Ford 1,100-acre facility near the Rouge River was once the world’s largest auto plant. Henry Ford built the plant in 1918 because he dreamed of building a car from start to finish in one location.

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Trivia of the Day for Friday

The University of Calgary offers a two-day course in igloo building.

Mailing an entire building has been illegal in the U.S. since 1916 when a man mailed a 40,000-ton brick house across Utah to avoid high freight rates.

The zoo in Tokyo closes for two months of the year so animals can have a holiday from visitors.

Methane gas can often be seen bubbling up from the bottom of ponds. It is produced by the decomposition of dead plants and animals in the mud.

The world’s smallest mammal is the bumblebee bat of Thailand, weighing less than a penny.

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Bonus Trivia

Why are sheriff’s badges star-shaped?

In primitive societies, the star was believed to possess magical powers. Principal among these was the power to guard against danger and control evil forces. During the Middle Ages the star was considered by many to represent all-powerful forces. It is believed because of its wide acceptance as the symbol of
guardianship, the star was the natural choice as the symbol for the office of sheriff.

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Trivia of the Day for Thursday

The Union ironclad, Monitor, was the first U.S. ship to have a flush toilet.

The U.S. city with the highest rate of lightning strikes per capita is Clearwater, Florida.

Kitsap County, Washington, was originally called Slaughter County, and the first hotel there was called the Slaughter House.

Men are 1.6 times more likely to undergo by-pass surgery than women.

There are 10 million bricks in the Empire State building.
Bob Dole is 10 years older than the Empire State Building.

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Trivia of the Day for Wednesday

In the wild, orcas are thought to live to seventy or eighty years of age. There is some evidence that females live longer than males, and the average life expectancy of male orcas is around forty to fifty years.

John Wilkes Booth’s brother once saved the life of Abraham Lincoln’s son.

Neutering a cat extends its life span by two or three years.
By law, in Bourbon, Mississippi, one small onion must be served with each glass of water in a restaurant.

The Tower of Independence clock on the back of a U.S. $100 dollar bill shows the time as 4:10.

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Trivia of the Day for Tuesday

At an NOAA conference in 1972, Roxcy Bolton proposed naming hurricanes after Senators instead of women. She also preferred “him-i-canes.”

For one day in 1998, Topeka, Kansas, renamed itself “ToPikachu” to mark Pokemon’s U.S. debut.

Horses can’t vomit.

Before settling on the Seven Dwarfs we know today, Disney also considered Chesty, Tubby, Burpy, Deafy, Hickey, Wheezy, and Awful.

The 1975 Dictionary of American Slang defines “happy cabbage” as money to be spent “on entertainment or other self-satisfying things.”

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