Father’s Day Trivia

As the idea of Father’s Day was conceived by Sonora Dodd of Spokane, Washington, to honor her father, William Stuart, she chose his birthday which was proclaimed on June 19, 1910, by Spokane’s mayor as the first Father’s Day.

In 1916, US President Woodrow Wilson approved the idea of observing an annual Father’s Day.

In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge made Father’s Day a national event.

In 1966 President Lyndon Johnson signed a presidential proclamation declaring the 3rd Sunday of June as Father’s Day.

Father’s Day is the fifth most popular card-sending holiday, with an estimated $100 million in card sales. Husbands, grandfathers, uncles, sons and sons-in-law are honored as well as father. Each year, 7 million Father’s Day cards are sent in the UK, compared to 13 million Mother’s Day cards.

Roses are the official flower for Father’s Day. A red rose is worn in the lapel if your father is living, a white rose if he is deceased.

While not everyone in America is a fan of Father’s Day, 72 percent of Americans plan to celebrate or acknowledge Father’s Day.

The necktie is the most popular and number one of all Father’s Day gifts according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Hammers and golf clubs are also popular presents for the day.

According to greetings card makers Hallmark, Father’s Day is the fifth-largest card-sending holiday.

These days, fathers are generally three years younger where births occur outside marriage. The average age of the father where the birth occurred outside marriage decreased from 28 to 26 between 1971 and 1991 but had since increased to almost 28 again in 1999.

The first presidential proclamation honoring fathers was issued in 1966 when President Lyndon Johnson designated the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Father’s Day has been celebrated annually since 1972 when President Richard Nixon signed the public law that made it permanent.

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