Monthly Archives: September 2015

Trivia of the Day for Wednesday

1 in every 4 Americans has appeared someway or another on television.

1 in 8 Americans has worked at a McDonalds restaurant.

70% of all boats sold are used for fishing.

Studies have shown children laugh an average of 300 times per day and adults 17 times per day, making the average child more optimistic, curious, and creative than the adult.

A pregnant goldfish is called a twit.

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Trivia of the Day for Tuesday

THE MOST UNUSUAL CANNONBALL: On two occasions, Miss ‘Rita Thunderbird’ remained inside the cannon despite a lot of gunpowder encouragement to do otherwise. She performed in a gold lamé bikini and on one of the two occasions (1977) Miss Thunderbird remained lodged in the cannon, while her bra was shot across the Thames River.

 

It has been estimated that humans use only 10% of their brain.

 

Valentine Tapley from Pike County, Missouri  grew chin whiskers attaining a length of twelve feet six inches from 1860 until his death 1910, protesting Abraham Lincoln’s election to the presidency.

 

Most Egyptians died by the time they were 30 about 300 years ago,

 

For some time Frederic Chopin, the composer and pianist, wore a beard on only one side of his face, explaining: “It does not matter, my audience sees only my right side.”

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Trivia of the Day for Monday

In a lifetime the average human produces enough quarts of spit to fill 2 swimming pools.

It’s against the law to doze off under a hair dryer in Florida/against the law to slap an old friend on the back in Georgia/against the law to Play hopscotch on a Sunday in Missouri.

Barbie’s measurements, if she were life-size, would be 39-29-33.

The human heart creates enough pressure to squirt blood 30ft.

One third of all cancers are sun related.

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Bonus Trivia

Why is a sports nut called a “fan?”

“Fan” is an abbreviation for the word “fanatic.” Toward the turn of the 19th century, various media referred to football enthusiasts first as “football fanatics,” and later as a “football fan.”

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Trivia of the Day for Sunday

Celery has negative calories! It takes more calories to eat a piece of celery than the celery has in it.

 

The average lead pencil will draw a line 35 miles long or write approximately 50,000 English words.  More than 2 billion pencils are manufactured each year in the United States. If these were laid end to end they would circle the world nine times.

 

The pop you hear when you crack your knuckles is actually a bubble of gas burning.

 

A literal translation of a standard traffic sign in China: “Give large space to the festive dog that makes sport in the roadway.”

 

You burn more calories sleeping than you do watching TV.

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Trivia of the Day for Saturday

When you sneeze, air and particles travel through the nostrils at speeds over100 mph.  During this time, all bodily functions stop, including your heart, contributing to the impossibility of keeping one’s eyes open during a sneeze.

 

Annual growth of WWW traffic is 314,000%

 

In 1778, fashionable women of Paris never went out in blustery weather without a lightning rod attached to their hats.

 

Sex burns 360 calories per hour.

 

A raisin dropped in a glass of fresh champagne will bounce up and down continually from the bottom of the glass to the top.

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Trivia of the Day for Friday

If one places a tiny amount of liquor on a scorpion, it will instantly go mad and sting itself to death.

 

It is illegal to hunt camels in the state of Arizona.

 

In eighteenth-century English gambling dens, there was an employee whose only job was to swallow the dice if there was a police raid.

 

The human tongue tastes bitter things with the taste buds toward the back. Salty and pungent flavors are tasted in the middle of the tongue, sweet flavors at the tip!

 

The first product to have a bar code was Wrigley’s gum.

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