Monthly Archives: March 2016

Trivia of the Day for Thursday

Nolan Ryan is the oldest pitcher in major league history to pitch a no-hitter.

When opossums are playing ‘possum’, they are not “playing.” They actually pass out from sheer terror.

An animal epidemic is called an epizootic.

Murphy’s Oil Soap is the chemical most commonly used to clean elephants.

The United States has never lost a war in which mules were used.

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Trivia of the Day for Wednesday

In Norfolk, Virginia, a woman can’t go out without wearing a corset.  (There was a civil-service job-for men only-called a corset inspector.)

In Oblong, Illinois, it’s punishable by law to make love while hunting or fishing on your wedding day.

In Oxford, Ohio, it’s illegal for a woman to strip off her clothing while standing in front of a man’s picture.

In hotels in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the law used to read every room is required to have twin beds. And the beds must always be a minimum of two feet apart when a couple rents a room for only one night. And it’s illegal to make love on the floor between the beds!

A Tremonton, Utah law states that no woman is allowed to have sex with a man while riding in an ambulance. In addition to normal charges, the woman’s name will be published in the local newspaper. The man does not receive any punishment.

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Trivia of the Day for Tuesday

Telephone Trivia:

Jane Barbie was the woman who did the voice recordings for the Bell System.

The first telephone exchange opened on January 28, 1878, in New Haven, Connecticut.
Month after month, the little Bell Company lived from hand to mouth. No salaries were paid in full. Often, for weeks, they were not paid at all. In Watson’s notebook there are such entries during this period as “Lent Bell fifty cents,” “Lent Hubbard twenty cents,” “Bought one bottle beer–too bad can’t have beer every day.”

When Bell’s patent was sixteen months old, there were 778 telephones in use.

The first “Hello” badge used to identify guests and hosts at conventions, parties, etc. was traced back to September 1880. It was on that date that the first Telephone Operators Convention was held at Niagra Falls and the “Hello” badge was created for that event.

Western Electric invented the loudspeaker which was initially called “loud-speaking telephone.”

Western Electric successfully brought sound to motion pictures and introduced systems of mobile communications which culminated in the cellular telephone.

During the depths of the Depression, telephones in use fell from 16 to 13 per 100 population and by the late 1970’s the number had surpassed 75 per 100 population.

Western Electric mass-produced color telephones for the first time in 1954.

In Japan, Western Electric first sold equipment in 1890, then in 1899 helped form the Nippon Electric Company (NEC). This was Japan’s first joint venture with an American firm.

The use of telephone answering machines became popular in 1974.

In the first month of the Bell Telephone Company’s existence in 1877, only six telephones were sold!

On December 23, 1947, Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill, N.J., held a secret demonstration of the transistor which marked the foundation of modern electronics.

In 1953, Sony Corporation obtained a transistor license from Western Electric Co. that led to its development of the world’s first commercially successful transistor radio.

In the early days of the telephone, operators would pick up a call and use the phrase, “Well, are you there?”. It wasn’t until 1895 that someone suggested answering the phone with the phrase “number please?”

Sometimes, early telephone operators would get to know their customers so well, the customers would ask for a reminder call when it was time to remove a cake from the oven, leave the phone off the hook near their sleeping child when they left the house, hoping the operator would hear any cries of distress, request a wake up call before taking a long nap.

Telephone is derived from two Greek words, tele + phone, meaning far off voice or sound.(Tele, far off + phone, voice or sound).

In Milan, Italy, when an operator dialed a wrong number, the phone company fined the operator.

Just like today’s computers, early telephones were very confusing to new users. Some became so frustrated with the new technology, they attacked the phone with an ax or ripped it out of the wall.

In the U.S., 54% of wireless phone users are men and 46% are women.

The number one reason people choose to buy a wireless phone is for safety (nearly 50% of those who own wireless phones purchased it for safety).

The first prototype of the sound-proof phone booth was built in 1877. Mr. Watson, Alexander Graham Bell’s trusty assistant, used a bunch of bed blankets around a box. He created the booth to prevent his landlady from listening in on his conversations.

Some callers didn’t like using the early phone booths because the doors would get stuck, forcing users to fight their way out.

In the early 1880’s some well-to-do telephone owners started the unusual trend of paying to have a theatre employee hold a telephone receiver backstage, transmitting live plays and operas into their living rooms.

The commercial wireless phone was first introduced in Chicago in 1982 by Ameritech.

The first mobile car phones were located in the car’s trunk, taking up nearly half of the space!

Phone service was established at the White House one year after its invention. President Rutherford B. Hayes was the first to have phone service (1877-81).

Fifteen years after its invention in 1876, there were five million phones in America. Fifteen years after its invention, more than 33 million wireless phones were in the U.S.

Being rude to a telephone operator in Prussia was once a crime.  In 1908, a respected citizen was reprimanded by the government after becoming exasperated with an operator and saying “My dear girl!”

When Alexander Graham Bell died on August 4, 1922, millions of phones went dead. In Bell’s honor, all phones served by the Bell System in the USA and Canada went silent for one minute.

The first transatlantic wedding took place on December 2, 1933.  The groom was in Michigan. The bride, in Sweden. The ceremony took seven minutes and cost $47.50.

In the late 30’s, a man named Abe Pickens of Cleveland, Ohio, attempted to promote world peace by placing personal calls to various country leaders. He managed to contact Mussolini, Hirohito, Franco and Hitler (Hitler, who didn’t understand English, transferred him to an aide). He spent$10,000 to “give
peace a chance.”

In the Catholic church, St. Gabriel, an archangel, is the patron saint of telecommunications.

One of the first telephone answering machines was developed in Switzerland during the 1950’s. It took three days to install.

The famous emergency hotline, whereby the President could have immediate contact with the Kremlin wasn’t established until 1984.  Prior to 1984, the only direct contact to the Kremlin was a cumbersome teleprinter link, supplying text messages that then had to be translated, responses drafted and sent back.

During President Lyndon Johnson’s term, many people misdialed the White House number and instead reached the home of a New York housewife. Rose Brown had a near identical phone number. He wrote
and thanked her for her diplomacy in receiving his highly sensitive calls and promised to return the favor when her friends and family accidentally dialed the White House.

Two days before Alexander Graham Bell married Mabel Hubbard in 1877, he gave her 99 percent of his company shares as a wedding gift. He kept a mere ten shares for himself.

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Trivia of the Day for Monday

The saying “it’s so cold out there it could freeze the balls off a brass monkey” came from when they had old cannons like ones used in the Civil War. The cannonballs were stacked in a pyramid formation, called a brass monkey. When it got extremely cold outside, they would crack and break off… Thus the saying.

Your stomach has to produce a new layer of mucus every two weeks or it will digest itself.

The Sanskrit word for “war” means “desire for more cows.”

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle; if the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died as a result of wounds received in battle; if the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

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Trivia of the Day for Sunday

“Three dog night” (attributed to Australian Aborigines) came about because on especially cold nights these nomadic people needed three dogs (dingos, actually) to keep from freezing.

Gilligan of Gilligan’s Island had a first name that was only used once, on the never-aired pilot show. His first name was Willy.  The skipper’s real name on Gilligan’s Island is Jonas Grumby. It was mentioned once in the first episode on their radio’s newscast about the wreck.

In England, the Speaker of the House is not allowed to speak.

Ivory bar soap floating was a mistake. They had been over mixing the soap formula causing excess air bubbles that made it float. Customers wrote and told how much they loved that it floated, and it has floated ever since. (It floats in gasoline, too.)

Studies show that if a cat falls off the seventh floor of a building it has about thirty percent less chance of surviving than a cat that falls off the twentieth floor. It supposedly takes about eight floors for the cat to realize what is occurring, relax and correct itself.

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Trivia of the Day for Saturday

The Baby Ruth candy bar was actually named after Grover Cleveland’s baby daughter, Ruth.

Armadillos have four babies at a time and they are always all the same sex.

Armadillos are the only animal besides humans that can get leprosy.

A group of unicorns is called a blessing. Twelve or more cows are known as a “flink.” A group of frogs is called an army. A group of rhinos is called a crash. A group of kangaroos is called a mob. A group of whales is called a pod. A group of ravens is called a murder. A group of officers is called a mess. A group of larks is called an exaltation. A group of owls is called a parliament.

The phrase “sleep tight” derives from the fact that early mattresses were filled with straw and held up with rope stretched across the bed frame. A tight sleep was a comfortable sleep.

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Trivia of the Day for Friday

In Los Angeles, California, a man is legally entitled to beat his wife with a leather belt or strap, but the belt can’t be wider than 2 inches, unless he has his wife’s consent to beat her with a wider strap. Consent
should be given prior to the event, as is carefully stipulated. [Not to be confused with the myth about “rule of thumb”‘s origin].

In Merryville, Missouri, women are prohibited from wearing corsets because “The privilege of admiring the curvaceous, unencumbered body of a young woman should not be denied to the normal, red-blooded American male.”

In Michigan, a woman isn’t allowed to cut her own hair without her husband’s permission.

In Nevada sex without a condom is considered illegal.

An ordinance in Newcastle, Wyoming, specifically bans couples from having sex while standing inside a store’s walk-in meat freezer!

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